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American journal of physiology. Renal physiology

A TRPM4-dependent current in murine renal primary cilia.


PMID 26290373

Abstract

Defects in primary cilia lead to a variety of human diseases. One of these, polycystic kidney disease, can be caused by defects in a Ca²⁺-gated ion channel (TRPP2) found on the cilium. Other ciliary functions also contribute to cystogenesis, and defects in apical Ca²⁺ homeostasis have been implicated. By recording directly from the native cilia of mIMCD-3 cells, a murine cell line of renal epithelial origin, we have identified a second Ca²⁺-gated channel in the ciliary membrane: the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4). In excised primary cilia, TRPM4 was found to have a low sensitivity to Ca²⁺, with an EC₅₀ of 646 μM at +100 mV. It was inhibited by MgATP and by 9-phenanthrol. The channel was not permeable to Ca²⁺ or Cl⁻ and had a permeability ratio PK/PNa of 1.42. Reducing the expression of Trpm4 mRNA with short hairpin (sh) RNA reduced the TRPM4 current by 87% and shortened primary cilia by 43%. When phospholipase C was inhibited, the sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ greatly increased (EC₅₀ = 26 μM at +100 mV), which is consistent with previous reports that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) modulates the channel. MgATP did not restore the channel to a preinactivation state, suggesting that the enzyme or substrate necessary for making PIP2 is not abundant in primary cilia of mIMCD-3 cells. The function of TRPM4 in renal primary cilia is not yet known, but it is likely to influence the apical Ca²⁺ dynamics of the cell, perhaps in tandem with TRPP2.

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