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FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Toll-like receptor 3-activated macrophages confer anti-HCV activity to hepatocytes through exosomes.


PMID 27605546

Abstract

Exosomes are a class of cell-released small vesicles that mediate intercellular communication by delivering functional factors to recipient cells. During hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the interaction between liver resident macrophages and hepatocytes is a key component in liver innate immunity. In this study, we explored the role of exosomes in the delivery of innate anti-HCV factors to hepatocytes from macrophages. We showed that supernatant from TLR3-activated macrophage cultures could efficiently inhibit HCV replication in Huh7 cells. This macrophage-mediated anti-HCV activity was through exosomes because inhibiting exosomes could abrogate the action of macrophages. Further analyses demonstrated that TLR3-activated macrophages release exosomes that contain anti-HCV microRNA (miRNA)-29 family members. Inhibiting miRNA29 could restore HCV replication. These findings suggest a novel antiviral mechanism in liver innate immunity against HCV infection and provide insights to support further studies on developing exosome-based delivery system for disease treatment.-Zhou, Y., Wang, X., Sun, L., Zhou, L., Ma, T.-C., Song, L., Wu, J.-G., Li, J.-L., Ho, W.-Z. Toll-like receptor 3-activated macrophages confer anti-HCV activity to hepatocytes through exosomes.