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Diabetes, obesity & metabolism

Efficacy and safety of initial combination therapy with gemigliptin and metformin compared with monotherapy with either drug in patients with type 2 diabetes: A double-blind randomized controlled trial (INICOM study).


PMID 27619558

Abstract

Gemigliptin is a new dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor. We investigated the efficacy and safety of initial combination therapy with gemigliptin and metformin compared with monotherapy with either drug in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A total of 433 T2D patients with a glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level of 7.5% to 11.0% and a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) concentration <270 mg/dL were randomly assigned to 3 groups: (1) gemigliptin 50 mg qd + metformin 1000 to 2000 mg qd (titrated individually), (2) gemigliptin 50 mg qd, or (3) metformin 1000 to 2000 mg qd. The primary end-point was the change in HbA1c level after 24 weeks. Secondary end-points were the changes in FPG, insulin, proinsulin and C-peptide levels. The percentages of responders who achieved an HbA1c level <7% (or <6.5%) were compared between treatment groups. Baseline HbA1c levels were 8.7% in all groups. The mean changes in HbA1c level from baseline to week 24 were -2.06%, -1.24% and -1.47% in the combination, gemigliptin monotherapy and metformin monotherapy groups, respectively. The 95% confidence intervals for between-group differences in HbA1c changes were -1.02 to -0.63 in the combination group vs the gemigliptin group and -0.82 to -0.41 vs the metformin group, which confirmed the superiority of combination therapy. A significantly higher percentage of patients in the combination therapy group reached the target HbA1c level <7% (or <6.5%) compared with the monotherapy groups. No severe side effects were observed. In T2D patients, the initial combination of gemigliptin and metformin had superior efficacy without safety concerns compared with monotherapy with either drug.