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Scientific reports

Homing of Cultured Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Their Effect on Traumatic Brain Injury in Rat Model.


PMID 28646184

Abstract

Transplanted endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may play an important role in reestablishing the endothelial integrity of the vessels after brain injury, and contribute to neurogenesis. We, therefore, tested the homing of ex vivo cultured peripheral blood-derived EPCs and their effect on injured brain tissue after intravenous administration. To track the homing of implanted EPCs in injured brain tissues, EPCs were labeled with DAPI and BrdU in vitro before transplantation. EPCs were transplanted into the host animal through peripheral administration through the femoral vein, and homing of EPCs was evaluated. The integration of intravenously injected EPCs into the injured brain tissue was demonstrated. Immunohistochemical staining showed that microvessel density in the perifocal region of EPCs-transplanted rats was significantly increased, and the numbers of BrdU+ cells in the DG of subventricular zone were increased in EPCs-transplanted rats as compared to the control group. Transplanted EPCs may play an important role in reestablishing the endothelial integrity in the vessels after brain injury and further contribute to neurogenesis. EPCs enhanced recovery following brain injury in a rat model of TBI.