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International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society

The Use of Endometrial Cancer Patient-Derived Organoid Culture for Drug Sensitivity Testing Is Feasible.


PMID 28683005

Abstract

Patient-derived organoids (PDOs), used in multiple tumor types, have allowed evaluation of tumor characteristics from individual patients. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of applying PDO in vitro culture for endocrine-based and drug sensitivity testing in endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer cells were enzymatically dissociated from tumors retrieved from fresh hysterectomy specimens and cultured within basement membrane extract in serum-free medium. An organoid growth assay was developed to assess the inhibitory effects of a variety of drugs including endocrine treatments. Organoid cultures were also prepared for histological and immunohistochemical comparison to the tumors of origin. Fifteen endometrial cancer specimens were successfully cultured as PDOs. Small spherical structures formed within 24 hours, and many continued to grow to larger, denser organoids, providing the basis for an organoid growth assay. The STAT3 transcription factor inhibitor, BBI608 (Napabucasin), strongly inhibited growth in almost all PDO cultures, suggesting that stemness programing is involved in organoid formation and/or growth. Inhibition by different growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors was observed in several PDO specimens. Four cultures were inhibited by fulvestrant, implying the importance of estrogen-receptor signaling in some PDO cultures. Organoids closely resembled their tumors of origin in both histomorphology and immunohistochemical expression. The use of endometrial cancer PDO cultures for development of drug sensitivity testing for individual patient tumors is feasible. The potential value of the PDO model for clinical decision making will require clinical trial evaluation.