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Cancer cell international

The human, F-actin-based cytoskeleton as a mutagen sensor.


PMID 29255378

Abstract

Forty years ago the actin cytoskeleton was determined to be disrupted in fibroblasts from persons with DNA repair-defective, hereditary colon cancer, with no clear connection between the cytoskeleton and DNA repair defects at that time. Recently, the large number of sequenced genomes has indicated that mammalian mutagenesis has a large stochastic component. As a result, large coding regions are large mutagen targets. Cytoskeletal protein-related coding regions (CPCRs), including extra-cellular matrix proteins, are among the largest coding regions in the genome and are indeed very commonly mutated in cancer. To determine whether mutagen sensitivity of the actin cytoskeleton could be assessed experimentally, we treated tissue culture cells with 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone and quantified overall cytoskeleton integrity with rhodamine-phalloidin stains for F-actin. The above approach indicated cytoskeletal degradation with increasing mutagen exposure, consistent with increased mutagenesis of CPCRs in TCGA, smoker samples, where overall mutation rates correlate with CPCR mutation rates (R Determination of cytoskeletal integrity may provide the opportunity to assess mutation burdens in nonclonal cell populations, such as in intact tissues, where DNA sequencing for heterogeneous mutation burdens can be challenging.

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78013
4-(Methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone, analytical standard
C10H13N3O2