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Journal of food science

Migration Study of Butylated Hydroxytoluene and Irganox 1010 from Polypropylene Treated with Severe Processing Conditions.


PMID 29574970

Abstract

Safety concerns have emerged over the increased use of polypropylene (PP) in food-packaging markets. Some antioxidants in PP can migrate to foods and cause undesirable effects in humans. In this study, migration behaviors of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and Irganox 1010 (I-1010) in PP sheets were determined according to the US FDA migration test conditions. In particular, we tested the effects of severe conditions of food processing and storage, such as autoclave heating (sterilization at about 121 °C), microwave radiation (700 W), and deep freezing (-30 °C) on migration of antioxidants. Migrant concentrations were higher in 95% ethanol as lipid food simulant, because of the hydrophobic nature of both PP and antioxidants. Autoclave heating treatment increased migrant concentrations compared with other processing conditions. Moreover, increased migrant concentrations by deep freezing condition were attributed to the brittleness of PP at freezing temperature. Regardless of processing conditions, BHT which has a lower molecular weight, migrated faster than I-1010. The antioxidants with hydrophobic nature such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and Irganox 1010 (I-1010) in polypropylene sheets would be migrated to foods, which is an important issue for industrial production food packaging materials. Migration behavior was promoted by severe processing conditions such as autoclave heating, microwave radiation, freezing, and especially autoclave heating treatment led the highest migration among them. Therefore, control of chemical additive migration from polypropylene food packaging is needed for safe food processing.

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