EMAIL THIS PAGE TO A FRIEND

Scientific reports

Aberrant neuronal differentiation is common in glioma but is associated neither with epileptic seizures nor with better survival.


PMID 30297697

Abstract

The mechanisms of glioma-associated seizures (GAS) have yet to be fully elucidated. Proneural subtype, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations, and epileptic seizures are closely associated suggesting that aberrant neuronal differentiation contributes to glioma-associated seizures. In a population-based cohort (n = 236), lack of stem cell marker expression (nestin, musashi) was significantly associated with IDH1 mutations and GAS at diagnosis. In vitro data suggested an association of IDH1 mutations and a more differentiated phenotype. Out of eight glioma stem cell (GSC) lines, seven revealed positivity for the synaptic marker protein synaptophysin. Three had synapse-like structures identified by electron microscopy and were either vGlut1 (glutamatergic) or GAD67 (GABAergic) positive. In vivo, >10% synaptophysin-positive tumour cells were present in >90% of all gliomas. Synaptophysin expression was associated with proneural subtype and vGlut1 expression, suggesting that most synapse-like structures in glioma are glutamatergic. However, we found null associations between vGlut1 protein/mRNA expression and survival, GAS at onset, development of GAS after resection, and refractory GAS. Synapse-like structures were neither functional nor activated by spontaneous action potentials or cellular networks. Thus, aberrant neuronal differentiation including glutamatergic synapse-like structures is detectable in glioma but is associated neither with epileptic seizures nor with better survival.