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Journal of animal science

The involvement of slaframine and swainsonine in slobbers syndrome: a review.


PMID 7665382

Abstract

The history of "slobbers syndrome," a mycotoxicosis associated with Rhizoctonia leguminicola infestation of pastures and stored forages, is discussed. The chemistry and physiological effects of the two known biologically active alkaloids of R. leguminicola, slaframine and swainsonine, are described. Slaframine administration is generally associated with increased exocrine function, especially salivation. Ingestion of swainsonine may be linked to serious and potentially lethal central nervous system defects similar to that described for locoism. However, the singular effects of these alkaloids do not completely account for the total clinical picture noted in the field during the occurrence of slobbers syndrome. It is possible that this phenomenon is the result of an interaction between both known and unidentified biologically active metabolites of R. leguminicola.

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