EMAIL THIS PAGE TO A FRIEND

Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

Use of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of fungal infections.


PMID 9636846

Abstract

Management of fungal infections is a major medical problem. The risk of developing a fungal infection is higher for patients who are undergoing dose-intensive therapy, are immunocompromised, have neutropenia, are receiving prophylactic antibiotics, have other infections, have invasive catheters, or have a history of severe trauma or burns. Survival is decreased among patients who develop fungal infection in these situations. In view of the high morbidity and mortality associated with fungal infections in transplant recipients, cytokines that enhance cell function, such as macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), have been investigated. M-CSF enhances cytotoxicity, superoxide production, phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and secondary cytokine production in monocytes and macrophages. Animal models and clinical data suggest efficacy of M-CSF in controlling fungal infection.

Related Materials

Product #

Image

Description

Molecular Formula

Add to Cart

AV44329
Anti-CSF1 antibody produced in rabbit, affinity isolated antibody