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The Journal of biological chemistry

Apical sorting of bovine enteropeptidase does not involve detergent-resistant association with sphingolipid-cholesterol rafts.


PMID 9880538

Abstract

Enteropeptidase is a heterodimeric type II membrane protein of the brush border of duodenal enterocytes. In this location, enteropeptidase cleaves and activates trypsinogen, thereby initiating the activation of other intestinal digestive enzymes. Recombinant bovine enteropeptidase was sorted directly to the apical surface of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Replacement of the cytoplasmic and signal anchor domains with a cleavable signal peptide (mutant proenteropeptidase lacking the amino-terminal signal anchor domain (dSA-BEK)) caused apical secretion. The additional amino-terminal deletion of a mucin-like domain (HL-BEK) resulted in secretion both apically and basolaterally. Further deletion of the noncatalytic heavy chain (L-BEK) resulted in apical secretion. Thus enteropeptidase appears to have at least three distinct sorting signals as follows: the light chain (L-BEK) directs apical sorting, addition of most of the heavy chain (HL-BEK) inhibits apical sorting, and addition of the mucin-like domain (dSA-BEK) restores apical sorting. Inhibition of N-linked glycosylation with tunicamycin or disruption of microtubules with colchicine caused L-BEK to be secreted equally into apical and basolateral compartments, whereas brefeldin A caused basolateral secretion of L-BEK. Full-length BEK was not found in detergent-resistant raft domains of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells or baby hamster kidney cells. These results suggest apical sorting of enteropeptidase depends on N-linked glycosylation of the serine protease domain and an amino-terminal segment that includes an O-glycosylated mucin-like domain and three potential N-glycosylation sites. In contrast to many apically targeted proteins, enteropeptidase does not form detergent-resistant associations with sphingolipid-cholesterol rafts.