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410497 Sigma-Aldrich

4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran

Dye content 98 %

Synonym: DCM

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Properties

Related Categories Laser Dyes, Materials Science, Organic and Printed Electronics, Photonic and Optical Materials
InChI Key   YLYPIBBGWLKELC-RMKNXTFCSA-N
composition   Dye content, 98%
mp   215-220 °C (lit.)
absorption   λmax 468 nm
OLED Device Performance   ITO/Alq3:DCM/Alq3/Mg:Ag
• Color: red
• Max. EQE: 1.3 %
  ITO/TPD/Alq3:DCM (10%)/Alq3/Mg:Ag
• Color: red
• Max. Luminance: 150 Cd/m2

Description

General description

4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM) is a red laser dye that consists of dicyanomethylene as an electron acceptor and dimethylaniline group as an electron donor. It has a π-conjugated 4H-pyran-4-ylidiene which bridges both the acceptor/donor groups. It can be used as a dopant and also in organic solid state lasers.

Application

DCM can be used as a laser dye to enhance the emission of distributed feedback (DFB) device by FÖrster resonance energy transfer (FRET). It may be used as a capping layer that allows the conversion of blue to red colored emission in organic light emitting diodes (OLED). DCM may also find potential applications in the enhancement of energy transfer of different devices like metal organic frameworks (MOFs), dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and polarity sensors.

Packaging

1 g in glass bottle

250 mg in glass insert

Features and Benefits

Voltage-tunable multicolor emission with enhanced luminance (~1000 cd/m2) was observed using varying amounts of DCM dye in a polymer light-emitting diode (PLED).

Safety & Documentation

Safety Information

Symbol 
Signal word 
Danger
Hazard statements 
Precautionary statements 
RIDADR 
UN 3175 4.1 / PGII
WGK Germany 
3
RTECS 
OO3746100
Flash Point(F) 
109.4 °F
Flash Point(C) 
43 °C

Documents

Certificate of Analysis

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Protocols & Articles

Articles

Fluorescence Quenching Microscopy: Imaging Two-Dimensional Materials

Alane Lim and Jiaxing Huang* Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA *Email: jiaxing-huang@northwestern.edu
Keywords: Chemical vapor deposition, Deposition, Diffraction, Materials Science, Microscopy, Optical microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, Solvents, Spectroscopy, Spin coating

Graphene in Biotechnology

Alba Centeno and Amaia Zurutuza Elorza* Graphenea S.A. Tolosa Hiribidea, 76, E-20018 Donostia - San Sebastian, Spain *Email: a.zurutuza@graphenea.com
Keywords: Adsorption, Angiogenesis, Bacterial conjugations, Building blocks, Cancer, Chemical vapor deposition, Degradations, Deposition, Diffusion, Diseases, Electronics, Gene expression, Growth factors, Immunostaining, Infrared spectroscopy, Ligands, Magnetic resonance imaging, Microscopy, Nanoelectronics, Nanomaterials, Nanotubes, Neuroscience, Nucleic acid hybridization, Positron Emission Tomography, Scanning electron microscopy, Transfection, Transmission electron microscopy

Peer-Reviewed Papers
15

References

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