siRNA

Nanoparticle Transfection Reagent

All ordering options are in the Available SKU-Pack Sizes table.

N-TER™ Nanoparticle siRNA Transfection Reagent is for the transfection of recalcitrant eukaryotic cells with siRNA (custom siRNA and predesigned siRNA) to achieve transient knockdown of gene expression. The reagent is a peptide that binds siRNA non-covalently, forming a nanoparticle. This nanoparticle interacts directly with lipids on the surface of the plasma membrane, thereby allowing the nanoparticle to diffuse across the membrane and deliver siRNA directly to the cytoplasm. Unlike most lipid reagents, this novel delivery mechanism bypasses the endosomal pathway, which eliminates possible compartmentalization and degradation of siRNA.


 Product Benefits

  • Superior delivery to difficult-to-transfect (primary, neuronal, differentiated, and non-dividing) cells
  • Simple protocol (Figure 1) that is easily adapted to high-throughput and reverse transfection applications
  • Quick delivery and reduced cytotoxicity compared to lipid reagents

The simple protocol for transfection of siRNA with our nanoparticle reagent


Figure 1.
The simple protocol for transfection of siRNA with our nanoparticle reagent.


 Product Features

  • Use in serum or serum-free media
  • Stable for up to 1 year at -20 °C
  • Three volume pack sizes

For general inquiries regarding this product, please send a request to sirnarequest@sial.com

 

Available SKU-Pack Sizes
Product No. Description  
N2913 120 µL
N2913 400 µL
N2913 1 mL


 Compatible Cell Types

Many cell lines have been successfully transfected with siRNA using N-TER.
 

Cell Lines & Tissue Sources
Cell Line Tissue Source
3T3-L1, differentiated adipocyte Mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line
A2780 Human ovarian carcinoma cell line
A549 Human lung carcinoma cell line
ASPC-1 Human pancreatic carcinoma cell line
Astrocyte Human neuronal primary cell
Astrocytoma Human neuronal astrocytoma cell line
BSMC Human bronchial smooth muscle primary cell
C2C12, differentiated myocyte Mouse myoblastoma line
HeLa Human cervical adenocarcinoma cell line
HepG2 Human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line
HT-29 Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line
HUVEC Human umbilical vein endothelial primary cell
MCF7 Human breast adenocarcinoma cell line
MDA-MB-231 Human breast adenocarcinoma cell line
NEHK-AD Human adult keratinocyte primary cell
Raw264.7 Mouse macrophage cell line
SW620 Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line
U-87 MG Human brain glioblastoma cell line


 Validation Data

To help avoid toxicity and complete more assays per day, the transfection medium may be removed and the cells assayed in as little as 3 and 6 hours, respectively (Figure 2).


N-TER quickly delivers siRNA into cells. Endpoint Expression Assay) HeLa Cells were transfected with 10 nM GAPDH siRNA. Transfection medium was replaced at the indicated time point, and cells were harvested 24 hours post-transfection. Real-Time Expression Assay) HeLa cells were transfected with 10 nM GAPDH siRNA. Cells were harvested at the indicated time points.

 

Figure 2. N-TER quickly delivers siRNA into cells. Endpoint Expression Assay) HeLa Cells were transfected with 10 nM GAPDH siRNA. Transfection medium was replaced at the indicated time point, and cells were harvested 24 hours post-transfection. Real-Time Expression Assay) HeLa cells were transfected with 10 nM GAPDH siRNA. Cells were harvested at the indicated time points.


 Select Citations

  • Langlois MA, Boniface C, Wang G, Alluin J, Salvaterra PM, Puymirat J, Rossi JJ & Lee NS (2005). Cytoplasmic and nuclear retained DMPK mRNAs are targets for RNA interference in myotonic dystrophy cells. J Biol Chem, 280, 16949-54.
  • Deshayes S, Gerbal-Chaloin S, Morris MC, Aldrian-Herrada G, Charnet P, Divita G & Heitz F (2004). On the mechanism of non-endosomial peptide-mediated cellular delivery of nucleic acids. Biochim Biophys Acta, 166, 141-7.
  • Morris KV, Chan SW, Jacobsen SE & Looney DJ (2004). Small interfering RNA-induced transcriptional gene silencing in human cells. Science, 305, 1289-92.
  • Simeoni F, Morris MC, Heitz F & Divita G (2003). Insight into the mechanism of the peptide-based gene delivery system MPG: implications for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells. Nucleic Acids Res, 31, 2717-24.
  • Morris MC, Vidal P, Chaloin L, Heitz F & Divita G (1997). A new peptide vector for efficient delivery of oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Nucleic Acids Res, 25, 2730-6.

If additional help is needed, please consult our technical services group at oligotechserv@sial.com.
 

MISSION is a trademark of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany and/or its affiliates.