70967

Sigma-Aldrich

GeneJuice® Transfection Reagent

Non-lipid based chemical transfection reagent optimized for maximum transfection efficiency, ease-of-use, and minimal cytotoxicity on a wide variety of mammallian cells.

storage conditions

+2C to +8C

Quality Level

manufacturer/tradename

Novagen®

storage condition

OK to freeze

application(s)

transfection: suitable

shipped in

wet ice

storage temp.

2-8°C

Related Categories

General description

""I use GeneJuice because it′s ease-of-use, low toxicity and wide range of target cells""
Stuart Rulten. Research Fellow. University of Sussex

""Since we have been working with GeneJuice, we have saved a lot of time and money!""
Dr. Andrea Kress, Institute of Clinical and Molecular Virology, Erlangen, Germany

""I find that Genejuice works for a multitude of cell types with minimal optimization""
Caitriona Marie Lyons. PhD Student. University College Cork, Ireland

Transfection is the process by which nucleic acids are introduced into mammalian cells. GeneJuice Transfection Reagent is a proprietary formulation optimized for maximal transfection efficiency, ease of use, and minimal cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Whereas many available transfection reagents are based on cationic lipid formulation, GeneJuice Transfection Reagent is composed of a nontoxic cellular protein and a small amount of a novel polyamine. GeneJuice Transfection Reagent enables highly efficient DNA transfer in both stable and transient transfections of eukaryotic cells and is ideal for high-throughput transfections in a multi-well plate format. The unique composition is compatible with both serum-containing and serum-free media, making media changes unnecessary during transfection experiments. Genejuice is a superior alternative to a wide variety of other techniques including calcium phosphate coprecipitation, electroporation, microinjection, biolistic particle delivery, lipofection, and complex formation with DEAE-dextran. The 1 ml size provides enough reagent to perform up to 500 transfections in standard 35 mm plates.


Cell lines transfected with GeneJuice® Transfection Reagent
Cell Lines:Primary Cells:
10T1/2

293T

3T3 NIH

3T3 Swiss

3T3-L1

A204

A431

A549

alpha TC1-6

AR 42J

As4.1

AtT-20

B50

BC-1

BC-2

BC3

BCBL

BHK-21

C3H/10T1/2

C6

C2C12
Caco-2

Caki-1

Calpan-1

Calu-1

Calu-6

CCL-131

CFPAC-1

Chang Liver

CHO

CHO-7

CHO-IR

CHO-K1

COS-1

COS-7

CS-1

CV-1

Daudi

DDTI MF-2

DT40

ECV304

EL4
ES-E14TG2a

EVSCC17M

H9c2

HCT-116

HEK293

HeLa

HeLa B

HeLa T4

Hep 3B2.1-7

HepG2

Hepa 1-6

Ht-29

HTB-37

HTB-45

Huh-7

HUVEC

IC21

IEC-6

JEG-3

Jurkat

KB
L57-3-11

L-6

L-929

MA-10

McA-RH7777

MCF-7

MCF-10-2A

MDCK

Melanocyte

MG-63

Neuro 2A

Neuroblastoma

NRK

NT2/D1

OV-1063

OVCAR3

P4

P19

PC12

PA317

PAM212
PS-1

R2C

RAW 264.7

RBL-2H3

RMP-41

SAOS-2

SC-1

Schneider line2

SK-N-MC

SK-N-SH

SKOV3

STO

SW-480

SW-837

T3M4

TM4

U937

UCD

Vero

Aortic smooth muscle cells

Astrocytes

Angioblasts

Chondrocytes

Chromaffin cells

Epithelial cells:

mammary

prostate

tracheal

Fibroblasts

Keratinocytes

Non-lipid based chemical transfection reagent optimized for maximum transfection efficiency, ease-of-use, and minimal cytotoxicity on a wide variety of mammallian cells.

Packaging

0.3 ml in Plastic ampoule
1, 10, 5 ml in Glass bottle

Features and Benefits

  • Highly efficient DNA transfer for both stable and transient transfections
  • Compatibility with both serum-containing and serum-free media
  • Simple protocolno need for media changes
  • Ideal for high-throughput transfection in a multi-well plate format
  • Ideal for retrovirus production for T-cell transduction
  • Works for a multitude of cell types with minimal optimization
  • Provides higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity than reagents from other suppliers
  • The 1 ml size provides enough reagent to perform up to 500 transfections in standard 35 mm plates

Warning

Toxicity: Flammable (J)

Preparation Note

For protocol, please click (here)

Other Notes

Due to the nature of the Hazardous Materials in this shipment, additional shipping charges may be applied to your order. Certain sizes may be exempt from the additional hazardous materials shipping charges. Please contact your local sales office for more information regarding these charges.

Legal Information

GeneJuice® is a registered trademark of EMD Chemicals Inc.
GENEJUICE is a registered trademark of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany
NOVAGEN is a registered trademark of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany

Pictograms

FlameExclamation mark

Signal Word

Danger

Hazard Statements

WGK Germany

WGK 1

Flash Point(F)

67.1 °F - Information taken from reference works and the literature.

Flash Point(C)

19.5 °C - Information taken from reference works and the literature.

Certificate of Analysis

Certificate of Origin

  1. Why do I need to perform optimization? How should I go about doing it?

    Each cell type behaves differently, by carrying out an optimization, the best transfection condition for your particular cell type can be determined. In other words, you can avoid putting too much transfection reagent on your cells, which may cause unnecessary toxicity issue and waste of precious transfection reagent. Optimization is suggested for every new combination of cell type and plasmid. The most important parameters are cell density and ratio of transfection reagent to DNA. Start with the volume of the selected transfection reagent (1x) and plasmid amount (1x) as recommended in the User Protocol. If those conditions do not yield the desired results, an optimization experiment can be performed. In a 24-well plate, plate the same amount of cells in each well. Set up a gradient across the plate and add the appropriate volume of transfection reagent (0.5x, 1x, 1.5x, 2x, 2.5x and 3x). Set up a gradient down the plate and add the appropriate amount of plasmid (0.5x, 1x, 1.5x and 2x). With a reporter gene in the plasmid, the optimal condition can be easily determined.

  2. What is the size limit for plasmid DNA?

    Large plasmids in the range of 12-15 kb can be transfected. We have cloned and expressed inserts encoding large proteins (including β-gal) without difficulty in mammalian cell lines.

  3. Is the quality of DNA important for good transfection?

    Yes, it is essential that the DNA to be transfected is of high quality and free of endotoxins. Plasmid DNA preparations should include an endotoxin removal step.

  4. How long should I leave the transfection reagent on the cells? Do I need to change medium at any time after transfection?

    Since our nucleic acid transfection reagents are compatible with serum-containing media, medium change after transfection is not necessary. The majority of cell types can be incubated with the transfection mix for 24-72h without any media change, and then harvested for the desired downstream application. If media change is necessary due to the toxicity of the protein being expressed, the transfection mixture can be removed after 2-8 h of incubation and replaced with complete growth medium.

  5. Can I use the product in the presence of serum?

    Yes. Our nucleic acid transfection reagents are effective for transfecting cells in media with or without serum. While cells can be incubated in media containing serum, it is absolutely critical that serum is NOT present during formation of the transfection reagent/DNA complex. For most applications, we recommend adding the transfection reagent/DNA complex (formed in serum-free media) to cells grown in complete growth media. For certain cell lines and experimental conditions, serum starvation of cells might be required. Since serum provides growth factors and nutrients, transfection efficiencies achieved with growth in serum containing media are typically better than those in serum-free media.

  6. Can the DNA transfection reagents be used for co-transfecting plasmids?

    Yes. Multiple plasmids can be transfected into the cell at the same time. The key is to maintain the optimal ratio of total DNA (all plasmids). See the User Protocols for more information on the ratio of reagent to DNA.

  7. Will antibiotics interfere with transfection?

    We do not recommend including antibiotics during the formation of the transfection reagent/DNA complex. Increased cell permeability during transfection causes high antibiotic influx, resulting in cell death. Some antibiotics (such as kanamycin) are cationic and can therefore interfere with transfection. Antibiotics such as penicillin and streptomycin can be present in the complete growth media (with serum) which is used to grow the cells. If you are generating stable transfectants, add selection antibiotics (e.g., G 418 or hygromycin) 48-72h after transfection.

  8. How do I scale my transfection protocol when working with different culture volumes?

    For most standard culture formats, guidelines are provided in the User Protocol. If you are using different culture volumes, vary the amounts of DNA, transfection reagent, cells, and culture media in proportion to the relative surface area while keeping the transfection reagent: DNA ratio constant.

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