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  • Identification and characterization of human MT5-MMP, a new membrane-bound activator of progelatinase a overexpressed in brain tumors.

Identification and characterization of human MT5-MMP, a new membrane-bound activator of progelatinase a overexpressed in brain tumors.

Cancer research (1999-06-11)
E Llano, A M Pendás, J P Freije, A Nakano, V Knäuper, G Murphy, C López-Otin
ABSTRACT

A cDNA encoding a new member of the membrane-type (MT) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family has been identified and cloned from a human brain cDNA library. The isolated cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 645 amino acids that displays a similar domain organization as other MMPs, including a predomain with the activation locus, a zinc-binding site, and a hemopexin domain. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a COOH-terminal extension, rich in hydrophobic residues and similar in size to the equivalent domains identified in MT-MMPs. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis of COS-7 cells transfected with the isolated cDNA revealed that the encoded protein is localized in the plasma membrane. On the basis of these features, this novel human MMP has been called MT5-MMP because it represents the fifth member of the MT-MMP subfamily of MMPs. Fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments showed that the human MT5-MMP gene (MMP-24) maps to 20q11.2, a region frequently amplified in tumors from diverse sources. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that MT5-MMP is predominantly expressed in brain, kidney, pancreas, and lung. In addition, MT5-MMP transcripts were detected at high levels compared to normal brain tissue in a series of brain tumors, including astrocytomas and glioblastomas. The catalytic domain of MT5-MMP, produced in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase, exhibits a potent proteolytic activity against progelatinase A, leading to the generation of the Mr 62,000 active form of this enzyme. These data suggest that MT5-MMP may contribute to the activation of progelatinase A in tumor tissues, in which it is overexpressed, thereby facilitating tumor progression.